Special Initiative ONEWORLD No Hunger

Since 2014, actors from politics, private sector, science and civil society have been working together in more than 200 projects in 35 countries to achieve one goal. A world without hunger by 2030.

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ONE WORLD - 15 Green Centers

Innovation means the change of routine. Whether technical or social, innovations are manifold and above all require the exchange of knowledge. This is why Germany has established the Green Innovation Centres in 15 partner countries. In this extra section you will find success stories, work examples and project reports.

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How to feed the world

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The special initiative One World no hunger (SEWOH) is one donor nation's attempt to decisively push forward the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 2 (SDG 2). Observations and conclusions from the accompanying discourse.

In the summer of 2019, António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations (UN), raised the alarm on the growing number of people going hungry. A “World Food Systems Summit” (UNFSS) in the autumn of 2021 intends to draw the necessary public attention to the issue of combatting hunger and increasing sustainability and provide fresh impetus for transforming the entire food system. In 2014, Germany’s Federal Minister of Economic Cooperation and Development, Gerd Müller, launched a remarkable experiment: SEWOH, the Special Initiative ONEWORLD No Hunger. The idea was to drastically advance UN Sustainable Development Goal 2 (SDG 2) with a sector approach initially driven by a single donor nation. Germany has invested around 1.5 billion euros annually towards achieving the UN goal, becoming the world’s second-largest donor in the fields of food security, rural development and agriculture. The initiative has explored new possibilities, yet it also had to face its limits. Vastly exacerbated by the Covid-19 pandemic, it had to realise the vulnerabilities of global food security.  

Population growth, lawlessness and dwindling resources, accelerated by climate change, are leading to conflicts that leave thousands dead across the Sahel every year. "Many will leave their homelands or perish from hunger, disease or wars. Only rapid socioeconomic development [...] would be able to prevent this disaster."

Claudia Ringler, Deputy Division Director of EPTD at IFPRI, describes the adverse impacts of climate change and its related risks on populations in poor countries. What can be done to reduce the impact of climate change on food and nutrition security?

To successfully combat hunger and malnutrition, we need a fundamental transformation of our conventional food systems. We asked experts and people on the ground who are actively involved in shaping sustainable, healthy and fair food systems.

Politics

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Interview with Dirk Schattschneider (BMZ)

For about a year now, Dirk Schattschneider has been the commissioner for the special initiative "ONEWORLD No Hunger" (SEWOH) of the BMZ. In the interview, he looks back on the challenges of the past year and at the same time takes a look into the future.

Interview with Dr Maria Flachsbarth (BMZ)

In August, Germany’s development ministry set up a division concentrating on One Health topics. Parliamentary State Secretary Maria Flachsbarth on knowledge gaps at the human-animal-environmental interface, the link between One Health and food security, and lessons learnt from previous pandemics.

A report by David Sahay (Zeitenspiegel)

110 speakers from 120 countries met virtually at the Global Forum for Food and Agriculture (GFFA) to discuss the challenges to global food supply. They asked the question: How can food systems support the health of people and the planet?

©GaÎl GellÈ
Cote d'Ivoire

Discussion about the potential supply chain law

The German government is struggling to pass a supply chain law. It is intended to address violations of human rights, social and environmental standards. What would the consequences be for business? A double interview with Veselina Vasileva from GEPA and economics professor Andreas Freytag.

By numbers

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Gender

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Launch of the digital exhibition

Women make the difference. Their potential for advancing rural development is enormous - and yet often remains untapped. We want to change that. Meet seven women who are changing their villages, provinces and countries - real "game changers".

When social shocks and disasters occur, school meals provide a strong incentive for families to keep sending their girls to school. © WFP/Nyani Quarmyne

By Carmen Burbano de Lara (WFP)

Besides the well known impacts of Covid19 lockdowns for the adult population, the associated school closures led to 90 percent of the world’s children with no access to schools. However, school meals are in often the only daily meal for children. Without access to this safety net, issues like hunger, poverty and malnutrition are exacerbated for hundreds of millions of children.

(c) Christoph Pueschner/Zeitenspiegel
Somalia / Mogadischu, Juli 2011: diese Frau floh mit ihren Kindern aus dem 250 Kilometer entfernten Baidoa in das IDP-Camp Al-Hidaaya. © Christoph Püschner/Zeitenspiegel

By Lisa Hücking (WHH)

Chancellor Merkel has begun an ambitious European political programme: Striving for compromise in budget negotiations, an orderly Brexit as well as an appropriate response to the corona crisis. Unfortunately, one of her positions that she previously held is nowhere to be found: Africa's prosperity is in the interest of Europe. 

Interview with Léa Rouanet

African countries still face huge gender gaps in terms of access to work and capital. What are the consequences of Corona for women in Africa? Jan Rübel interviewed Léa Rouanet on lockdowns and gender-based violence. The economist works at the Africa Gender Innovation Lab of the World Bank.

Food Systems

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A study by Markus Hanisch, Agustina Malvido, Johanna Hansmann, Alexander Mewes, Moritz Reigl, Nicole Paganini (SLE)

Post-Covid-19 lockdown: How food governance processes could include marginalised communities - an extract of the results of an SLE study applying digital and participatory methods.

A report by Johanna Steinkühler (GIZ)

The soybean is a natural crop that can be used to make a lot of food. So, Tata Bi started a small processing business first on her own, then with a few other women, which provides the women with an additional source of income year-round besides selling the soybeans.

A study by SLE

The lockdown due to COVID-19 hit the economy hard - including agriculture in particular with its supply chains and sales markets. What creative coping strategies have those affected found? The Seminar for Rural Development has begun a research study on th

A contribution by GIZ

There is a multitude of reasons why we should value fish, small-scale fisheries, and artisanal aquaculture. We have put together 24 reasons to love fish to highlight the importance of the sector for culture and identity, food security, health, livelihoods, economic security and the sustainable management of natural resources.

Digitalization & Innovation

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A contribution by Michel Bernhardt (GIZ)

The project “Scaling digital agriculture innovations through start-ups” (SAIS) supports Africans going into business in the agricultural and food sector in scaling their digital innovations and thus reaching out to a larger number of users.

A competition by the BMZ

The GIZ Innovation Challenge 2021 promotes ideas for integrating agroecological approaches into agricultural advisory services. Consortia from research, advisory, and business could apply until May 31 to receive innovation partnerships of up to 150,000 euros to further develop their original concept.

A competition by the BMZ

15 Candidates from over 1,000 applicants have presented their ideas to an international jury. The three winners in the categories of renewable energies, mechanization and digitalization were able to look forward to support packages worth a total of 240,000 EUR.

Arbeiter in der Reismuehle Labana Rice Limited in Birnin Kebbi/Nigeria. © Thomas Imo, GIZ

A contribution by Welthungerhilfe

Africa is home to the world’s youngest and fastest growing population. For many young people, agriculture could offer a job perspective. But to improve the living conditions and job prospects of young people in rural areas, political reforms and investments are desperately needed, as these people will be at the centre of agriculture and agricultural development in the future.

Climate

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(c) Britta Radike/GIZ
Burundi: Wiederaufforstung der Berghänge gegen Klimawandel und Bodenerosion.

Interview with Bernadette Arakwiye und Salima Mahamoudou (World Resources Institute)

Deforestation is leading to a shortage of ressources. What are the options for counteracting? A conversation with Bernadette Arakwiye and Salima Mahamoudou about renaturation and the possibilities of artificial intelligence.

Event report by Jan Rübel (Zeitenspiegel)

The first Climate Adaptation Summit put climate adaptation at the center of politics for the first time. The virtual meeting united global players with one goal: building resilience is just as important as climate protection itself. Around 15,000 participants discussed direct proposals.

(c) Mali Lazell/GIZ
Ruanda / Kigali, 2020: Teilnehmer des IOT-Trainings im Digital Transformation Center Kigali.

Interview with Cyrus Samimi (IAS)

Environmental change is having a particularly strong impact on the African continent. Its landscapes see both negative and positive processes. What is science's view of this? A conversation with Cyrus Samimi about mobility for livelihoods, urban gardening and dealing with nature.

Katie Gallus und Tim Schreder beim Abschlus der Challenge 10.000 Bäume in 10 Tagen © GIZ_Photothek

By GIZ and BMZ

It began with clicks at a trade fair and ends with concrete reforestation: a campaign at the Green Week in Berlin is now enriching the forests of the Yen Bai Province in Vietnam. A chronicle of an education about climatic relevance to concrete action - and about the short distances on our planet.

Projects

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Why we are hereOne World No Hunger until 2030. That is our common goal. To achieve it we pursue various approaches and ideas that we present here.
Why we are hereOne World No Hunger until 2030. That is our common goal. To achieve it we pursue various approaches and ideas that we present here.
Why we are hereOne World No Hunger until 2030. That is our common goal. To achieve it we pursue various approaches and ideas that we present here.
Why we are hereOne World No Hunger until 2030. That is our common goal. To achieve it we pursue various approaches and ideas that we present here.
Why we are hereOne World No Hunger until 2030. That is our common goal. To achieve it we pursue various approaches and ideas that we present here.
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Days to 2030