About the Special Initiative One World - no Hunger

A world without hunger – the world community has set this as a long-term development goal (SDG-2). By 2030 there should be no more hunger, everyone should have a sufficient and balanced diet, and agriculture should be organised sustainably so that future generations can also be fed.

 

Farmer Besanesch Saboka and her daughter Asnaketsch Mori on their way to the market in Katchisi in the Ginde Beret region; Ethiopia © Rainer Kwiotek / Menschen für Menschen
Farmer Besanesch Saboka and her daughter Asnaketsch Mori on their way to the market in Katchisi in the Ginde Beret region; Ethiopia © Rainer Kwiotek / Menschen für Menschen

This target is acutely at risk.  The number of starving people has even been rising again since 2015: Conflicts, wars and environmental catastrophes caused by climate change are occurring with ever greater frequency – which means no human right is violated more than the right to food.

 

Far in excess of 800 million people are suffering from hunger. On a human scale, one person in ten goes to bed hungry tonight. More than one billion people also suffer from “hidden hunger”: They are malnourished because their food lacks variety and is too low in vital nutrients. This is the situation for almost two billion people, who are not adequately nourished to lead a dignified, healthy and active life. Particularly affected: Rural regions. Three quarters of all undernourished and malnourished people live in rural regions – where there is a shortage of employment and income and where poverty rates are highest. The main cause of hunger and malnourishment is not a lack of food. Rather it is poverty, above all, which prevents people from acquiring sufficient and healthy food.

 

Nigeria: Digitalisierung und Microversicherungen schützen Landwirte gegen klimabedingte Ernteausfälle. (c) Christoph Mohr/GIZ
Nigeria: Digitalisierung und Microversicherungen schützen Landwirte gegen klimabedingte Ernteausfälle. (c) Christoph Mohr/GIZ

With the special initiative “ONE WORLD - no Hunger”, (SEWOH) German politics, business, science and civil society are confronting these challenges to humanity. There are different approaches and ideas towards achieving the objective. The battle against hunger can only be won if civil society, science, business and politics are willing to augment their expertise and learn mutually from experience.

 

The projects of SEWOH fund a rural development, which helps retain the natural livelihoods of the rural population and makes them more resilient against the consequences of climate change and crises. Based on sustainable agriculture, the projects establish paths out of undernourishment and malnourishment and greater prosperity in rural regions, above all in Africa. Better local value creation and education ensure rising income and jobs both within and outside of agriculture. Because one thing is clear: Many potentials in agriculture have not yet been fully utilised, while others are only just undergoing development.

 

The aim of Agenda 2030 to end hunger and the G7 resolutions adopted at Elmau to free 500 million people from hunger and malnourishment by 2030 can be achieved – together with all partner governments involved, in conjunction with other donors and international organisations and alongside collaboration by all social forces from civil society, associations, science and business.

 

This website brings these different partners together. An information portal is being developed, allowing all partners to report transparently about their work locally, their worldwide programmes and projects. The information on projects, countries and topics is supplemented by a magazine published regularly. Here various experts discuss practical approaches to solutions and inform about topics such as rural development, hunger and malnourishment.

 

 

Selected partner- and project countries